Three More Inches of Winter

Or 8 centimetres, whichever you prefer. The snow arrived last night and it was still falling this morning, turning our world white. Again. Yes, a sure sign of spring in Alberta.

A month ago we were hiking the Sonoran Desert, panting in the heat, searching for shade. The snakes and lizards were out — and a profusion of flowers. A much nicer view right now. 🙂

Blue palo verde
Blue palo verde
Bougainvillea
Bougainvillea
Evening primrose
Evening primrose
Chuparosa
Chuparosa
Brittlebush
Brittlebush
Strawberry hedgehog
Strawberry hedgehog

A Flowerful History

Bougainvillea is one of my favourite flowers. Although not native to the Sonoran Desert, it’s one of the most recognizable plants here and elsewhere, a subtropical woody shrub prized for its beautiful colours.

But here’s the rub: those colours — from red and purple to salmon, orange and white — ain’t the real flowers.

The “petals” are actually specialized leaves, called bracts. The real flowers are small and slim and white.

Many plants are named for people, as is this one. It honours Louis Antoine de Bougainville (1729-1811), a Parisian with an unusual history. He trained as a lawyer but gave that up for a career in the army. He became a musketeer (yes, one of those sword-wielding fellows), then sailed to Canada where he fought the British in an effort to save Quebec.

On his return to France he switched careers again, this time joining the navy. He lead the first French circumnavigation of the globe (1766-1769). He discovered the plant that bears his name in Brazil. (Obviously intrigued by plants he named his son Hyacinthe.)

Along on Bougainville’s trip, disguised as a man, was Jeanne Baré (sometimes spelled Baret or Barret) — who thus became the first French woman to sail around the world.

And by now, you can probably guess the national flower of Grenada.

Who knew a flower could cover so much ground!

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Bougainvillea   Bougainvillea spp.